Skip links

Darpan News Analysis , 30 Nov 2018

Share

Items at a glance

GENERAL STUDIES II

  • Saubhagya Scheme Helps 8 States Achieve 100 % Electrification.

GENERAL STUDIES III

  • Climate Change And Food Security: UN Report.
  • Salt Water Crocodile.
  • Cyclone Titli Rarest Of Rare : RIMES.

FACTS FOR PRELIMS

  • Bhasha Sangam.

 

GENERAL STUDIES II

 Topic

  • Welfare schemes for vulnerable sections of the population by the Centre and States and the performance of these schemes; mechanisms, laws, institutions and Bodies constituted for the protection and betterment of these vulnerable sections.

 SAUBHAGYA SCHEME HELPS 8 STATES ACHIEVE 100 % ELECTRIFICATION

News

  • According to the Union Ministry of Power Eight States have achieved 100 per cent saturation in household electrification under Saubhagya namely Madhya Pradesh, Tripura, Bihar, J&K, Mizoram, Sikkim, Telangana and West Bengal.

Saubhagya scheme

  • Pradhan Mantri Bhijli Har Ghar Yojana or Saubhagya scheme is intended to provide energy access to all by last mile connectivity and electricity connections to all remaining un-electrified households in rural as well as urban areas to achieve universal electrification.
  • The beneficiaries for free electricity connections would be identified using Socio Economic and Caste Census (SECC) 2011 data.
  • However, un-electrified households not covered under the SECC data would also be provided electricity connections under the scheme on payment of Rs. 500 which shall be recovered by DISCOMs in 10 instalments through electricity bill.
  • The solar power packs of 200 to 300 Wp with battery bank for un-electrified households located in remote and inaccessible areas, comprises of Five LED lights, One DC fan, One DC power plug.
  • It also includes the Repair and Maintenance (R&M) for 5 years.
  • Major impacts:
    • Environmental upgradation by substitution of Kerosene for lighting purposes.
    • Improvement education services.
    • Better health services.
    • Enhanced connectivity through radio, television, mobiles, etc.
    • Increased economic activities and jobs.
    • Improved quality of life especially for women.

 Recent news

 

GENERAL STUDIES III

 Topic

  • Conservation, environmental pollution and degradation, environmental impact assessment Disaster and disaster management.

 CLIMATE CHANGE AND FOOD SECURITY : UN REPORT

News

  • Increasing farm output is hard given the fragility of the natural resource base.

 Major highlights

  • According to the recent report of the U.N Food and Agricultural Organisation Feeding a hungry planet is growing increasingly difficult as climate change and depletion of land and other resources undermine food systems.
  • Population growth requires supplies of more nutritious food at affordable prices.
  • But increasing farm output is hard given the “fragility of the natural resource base” since humans have outstripped Earth’s carrying capacity in terms of land, water and climate change, the report said.
  • The FAO and International Food Policy Research Institute released the report at the outset of a global conference aimed at speeding up efforts to achieve zero hunger around the world.
  • Global scenario:
    • Food security remains tenuous for many millions of people who lack access to affordable, adequately nourishing diets for a variety of reasons, the most common being poverty.
    • But it’s also endangered by civil strife and other conflicts.
    • In Yemen, where thousands of civilians have died in airstrikes by a Saudi-led coalition, the aid group Save the Children says 85,000 children under 5 may have died of hunger or disease in the civil war.
    • In Afghanistan, severe drought and conflict have displaced more than 2,50,000 people, according to UNHCR, the U.N. refugee agency.
  • Important concerns:
    • The FAO estimates that global demand for food will jump by half from 2013 to 2050.
    • Farmers can expand land use to help make up some of the difference, but that option is constrained in places like Asia and the Pacific and urbanisation is eating up still more land that once may have been used for agriculture.
    • Increasing farm output beyond sustainable levels can cause permanent damage to ecosystems, the report said.

Recent news

 

Topic

  • Conservation, environmental pollution and degradation.

 SALT WATER CROCODILE

News

  • Saltwater crocodiles have been recently sighted in Krishna district of Andhra Pradesh showing signs of migration of species.

Major highlights

  • At least two saltwater crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus) have been sighted in the State coast within a month indicating migration of the species from the Odisha coast.
  • The estimated number of the saltwater crocodiles increased from 96 in 1976 to 1,640 in 2012 in India due to the rear and release programme established under the Indian Crocodile Conservation Project.
  • There have been reports of 131 attacks of the saltwater crocodile in Bangladesh, India and Sri Lanka between 2009 and 2014 May.

Salt Water Crocodile

  • The saltwater crocodile also known as the eustarine crocodile, Indo-Pacific crocodile, marine crocodile, sea crocodile is the largest of all living reptiles as well as the largest riparian predator in the world.
  • IUCN Status : Least Concern.
  • As its name, it can live in marine environments, but usually resides in saline and brackish mangrove swamps, estuaries, deltas, lagoons and lower stretches of rivers.
  • They have the broadest distribution of any modern crocodile, ranging from eastern coast of India throughout most of Southeast Asia and northern Australia.
  • Distribution:
    • A large population of Salt water crocodile is present within the Bhitarkanika Wildlife Sanctuary of Odisha and they are known to be present in smaller numbers throughout Indian and Bangladeshi portions of Sundarbans.
    • Population also present within the mangrove forests and other coastal areas of the Andaman and Nicobar islands.
    • It was also once present throughout most of the island of Sri Lanka but remain mostly within protected areas such as Yala National Park.

 Recent news

 

Topic

  • Disaster and disaster management.

 CYCLONE TITLI RAREST OF RARE : RIMES

News

  • RIMES has recently termed “Cyclone Titli” as rarest of rare cyclones.

 Major highlights

  • The Regional Integrated Multi-Hazard Early Warning System (RIMES) for Africa and Asia, a 45-nation international organisation on disaster warning, has termed ‘Titli’, the severe cyclonic storm that devastated Odisha as ‘rarest cyclone’.
  • More than 200 years of cyclone track history in the Odisha coast reveals that the Titli cyclone is the rarest of rare in terms of its characteristics such as recurvature after landfall and retaining its destructive potential after landfall and recurvature away from the coastal areas for more than two day.
  • Considering the history of cyclone tracks, no synthetic track projection captures the Titli type of cyclones.

QUICK RECAP

Regional Integrated Multi-Hazard Early Warning System (RIMES)

  • The Regional Integrated Multi-Hazard Early Warning System for Africa and Asia (RIMES) is an international and intergovernmental institution.
  • It is owned and managed by its Member States, for the generation and application of early warning information.
  • RIMES evolved from the efforts of countries in Africa and Asia, in the aftermath of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, to establish a regional early warning system within a multi-hazard framework for the generation and communication of early warning information.
  • Functions:
    • Hazard monitoring, detection, analysis, prediction, and forecasting.
    • Risk assessment.
    • Potential impact analysis.
    • Generation of tailored risk information at different time scales.
    • Risk communication.
    • Application of tailored risk information in decision-making.

Recent news

 

 FACTS FOR PRELIMS

 BHASHA SANGAM

About

  • The programme “Ek Bharat Shreshtha Bharat” has been initiated to celebrate the spirit of national integration.
  • Bhasha Sangam marks the unique symphony of languages of our country and is an expression of our shared dreams, hopes and aspirations for one India.
  • Objectives of the programme:
    • To introduce school students to all the 22 Indian Languages of Schedule VIII of the Constitution of India.
    • To enhance linguistic tolerance and respect, and promote national integration.

Recent news

 

 

Join the Discussion

Return to top of page